Logo Boston Teawrights 2015 (Two Toned)

A Teawright’s Blog

— Let’s explore the art of Tea Craft —

Where Does Tea Flavor Come From?

Tea dates back as far as 2737 BC, when legend claims it was discovered in China. Today, tea is grown and consumed all around the world, but where it’s grown plays a crucial role in how the tea develops and tastes. This concept is known as terroir, the environmental conditions, particularly soil and climate, which influences the flavor and aroma of any given food or beverage. There’s a lot that goes into tea terroir, but let’s start off with the basics!

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Kakuzo Okakura’s The Book of Tea Part 6

The Book of Tea is an essay written by Kakuzo Okakura in 1906. It’s considered one of the classics of tea culture and has held a wide influence for more than a century. In his essay, Okakura addresses us (the Western audience) and discusses the role of tea in Japanese culture.

So to give you something interesting to read, I’m sharing his work here. Each week I release a new section, doing my best to illuminate the passages with images & highlighting quotations I find interesting.

We continue now with the sixth part: “Flowers”.

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Kakuzo Okakura’s The Book of Tea Part 5

The Book of Tea is an essay written by Kakuzo Okakura in 1906. It’s considered one of the classics of tea culture and has held a wide influence for more than a century. In his essay, Okakura addresses us (the Western audience) and discusses the role of tea in Japanese culture.

So to give you something interesting to read, I’m sharing his work here. Each week I release a new section, doing my best to illuminate the passages with images & highlighting quotations I find interesting.

We continue now with the fifth part: “Art Appreciation”.

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Kakuzo Okakura’s The Book of Tea Part 4

The Book of Tea is an essay written by Kakuzo Okakura in 1906. It’s considered one of the classics of tea culture and has held a wide influence for more than a century. In his essay, Okakura addresses us (the Western audience) and discusses the role of tea in Japanese culture.

So to give you something interesting to read, I’m sharing his work here. Each week I release a new section, doing my best to illuminate the passages with images & highlighting quotations I find interesting.

We continue now with the fourth part: “The Tea-Room”.

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Kakuzo Okakura’s The Book of Tea Part 3

The Book of Tea is an essay written by Kakuzo Okakura in 1906. It’s considered one of the classics of tea culture and has held a wide influence for more than a century. In his essay, Okakura addresses us (the Western audience) and discusses the role of tea in Japanese culture.

So to give you something interesting to read, I’m sharing his work here. Each week I release a new section, doing my best to illuminate the passages with images & highlighting quotations I find interesting.

We continue now with the third part: “Taoism & Zennism”.

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Kakuzo Okakura’s The Book of Tea Part 2

The Book of Tea is an essay written by Kakuzo Okakura in 1906. It’s considered one of the classics of tea culture and has held a wide influence for more than a century. In his essay, Okakura addresses us (the Western audience) and discusses the role of tea in Japanese culture.

So to give you something interesting to read, I’m sharing his work here. Each week I release a new section, doing my best to illuminate the passages with images & highlighting quotations I find interesting.

We continue now with the second part: “The Schools of Tea”.

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Tea Tannins Part 3 – Black Tea

Introduction Tannins, the common name for a group of compounds that food scientists prefer to give a more complicated name. They like to call them plant polyphenols since they’re molecular compounds composed of multiple phenolic groups. If I just lost you, it’s ok,... read more

Kakuzo Okakura’s The Book of Tea Part 1

The Book of Tea is an essay written by Kakuzo Okakura in 1906. It’s considered one of the classics of tea culture and has held a wide influence for more than a century. In his essay, Okakura addresses us (the Western audience) and discusses the role of tea in Japanese culture.

So to give you something interesting to read, I’m sharing his work here. Each week I’ll release a new section, doing my best to illuminate the passages with images & highlighting quotations I find interesting.

We begin with the first part: “The Cup of Humanity”.

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